Pretty Sure the Moon Would Fall out of Orbit and into the Sun Too?

pretty sure the moon would fall out of orbit and into the sun too?
  1. Cameron Knowles Appleton says:
    merica, noooooooooo
    merica, noooooooooo
  2. Mara Archaeopteryx Smith says:
    Dammit, my sunglasses were in there...
    Dammit, my sunglasses were in there...
  3. Eric Mintz says:
    Shinku...HADOUKEN! Alternatively: The Day Goku Kamehameha'd the Earth.
    Shinku...HADOUKEN! Alternatively: The Day Goku Kamehameha'd the Earth.
  4. Rob Oblender says:
    It would fall out of orbit of the earth, but into orbit of the sun..
    It would fall out of orbit of the earth, but into orbit of the sun..
  5. Krystal Rose Schrot says:
    Dude, that would royally suck.
    Dude, that would royally suck.
  6. Matthew Murray says:
    what two weeks of waiting for the spirit ball on toonami actually would have accomplished
    what two weeks of waiting for the spirit ball on toonami actually would have accomplished
  7. Adithya Balasubramanian says:
    rofll
    rofll
  8. Adithya Balasubramanian says:
    rofll
    rofll
  9. Julian Reischl says:
    I guess the gravity relations would not change much. You see, the mass of the Earth is still there, most of it will fall back together to form a planet again. A few hundred million years on, life might be happening again. The moon has actually been formed when a Mars-sized object collided with Earth long ago. Part of the debris vanished into space (escape velocity), part fell back and the bits that were in orbit clumped together to make the moon. At least that's one of the foremost theories on that. It would explain why always the same side of the moon points to earth, which is totally rare.
    I guess the gravity relations would not change much. You see, the mass of the Earth is still there, most of it will fall back together to form a planet again. A few hundred million years on, life might be happening again. The moon has actually been formed when a Mars-sized object collided with Earth long ago. Part of the debris vanished into space (escape velocity), part fell back and the bits that were in orbit clumped together to make the moon. At least that's one of the foremost theories on that. It would explain why always the same side of the moon points to earth, which is totally rare.
  10. Julian Reischl says:
    I guess the gravity relations would not change much. You see, the mass of the Earth is still there, most of it will fall back together to form a planet again. A few hundred million years on, life might be happening again. The moon has actually been formed when a Mars-sized object collided with Earth long ago. Part of the debris vanished into space (escape velocity), part fell back and the bits that were in orbit clumped together to make the moon. At least that's one of the foremost theories on that. It would explain why always the same side of the moon points to earth, which is totally rare.
    I guess the gravity relations would not change much. You see, the mass of the Earth is still there, most of it will fall back together to form a planet again. A few hundred million years on, life might be happening again. The moon has actually been formed when a Mars-sized object collided with Earth long ago. Part of the debris vanished into space (escape velocity), part fell back and the bits that were in orbit clumped together to make the moon. At least that's one of the foremost theories on that. It would explain why always the same side of the moon points to earth, which is totally rare.